Not sure what RPM, CPC, or other terms you see in your Google Adsense ad reports mean? Review Google glossary to learn the details behind how these terms are calculated and how to interpret them.

% of Recent Ad Impressions
The percentage of total ad impressions recently generated by ads in a particular category.

% of Recent Earnings
The percentage of total earnings recently generated by ads in this category.

Abandonment rate
The percentage of times a user abandons a video being viewed before completion.

Above the fold
“Above the fold”, or the top fold of the page, refer to the portion of the page a user can see without scrolling down.

Account email
The email address that you use to log in to your AdSense account. This is the address to which Google will send all AdSense-related communications to you.

Account type
Generally, if you are a business with 20 or more employees, you should apply as a Business account. Individual publishers, or businesses with less than 20 employees, should sign up as an Individual account. There is no difference in the services or payment structure between Individual and Business accounts. Business account payments will be made payable to the Company Name, while Individual accounts are paid out to the Payee Name of the account holder.

Active View CPM
With Active View cost-per-thousand impressions (Active View CPM) bidding, advertisers bid on 1,000 viewable impressions and only pay for impressions that are measured as viewable, that is, when at least 50% of the ad is displayed on-screen for at least one second.

Active View Measurable
The percentage of impressions that were measurable with Active View, out of the total number of impressions. This metric only includes impressions from regular AdSense for content, AdSense for video and AdSense for games ad units. It doesn’t include data from link units or data from dynamic allocation in Google Ad Manager.

Even when an ad has Active View, some factors may prevent the tag from capturing data. For example, if the publisher ad tag is placed within a cross-domain iframe, its viewability may not be measurable. Also, when an ad’s backup image is displayed or a default ad served, the impression does not count as measurable.

Active View Viewable
The percentage of impressions that were viewable out of all measurable impressions. This metric only includes impressions from regular AdSense for content, AdSense for video and AdSense for games ad units. It doesn’t include data from link units or data from dynamic allocation in Google Ad Manager.

All viewable ads are measurable, because you can’t confirm that an ad has met the criteria for viewability unless it can be measured. For example, say the ads on your site had 100 measurable impressions. That means there were 100 impressions where Active View tags were able to measure viewability. If only 10 of those 100 impressions were measured as viewable, then the site would have 10% Active View Viewability.

Ad CTR
For standard ads, your ad click-through rate (CTR) is the number of ad clicks divided by the number of individual ad impressions.

Ad CTR = Clicks / Ad impressions

For example, if your ad received five clicks out of 1,000 ad impressions, then your ad CTR would be 0.5%.

For link units, the number of ad clicks is divided by the number of impressions for the page of ads that appears when a link unit is clicked on.

Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Ad format
The way an ad is shown to the users on your site. For example, an ad may be displayed within the content of your page (e.g. text and display ads), displayed over the top of your page (e.g. anchor ads), etc.

Different ad formats can support different ad types, such as text, display, video, etc. Ad formats may also vary in the number of individual ads they display. For example, the banner ad format will display up to two ads horizontally across the page and the skyscraper will display up to four ads vertically.

Ad formats dimension
How the ad was shown to the user. For example, was the ad displayed directly within the content of your page, was it displayed over the top, etc.

Values

  • In-page: The default value for ads that are shown within your content, as opposed to overlayed over it.
  • In-feed: Native ads that slot neatly inside a list of articles or products on your site.
  • In-article: Native ads that are optimised by Google to help you put great-looking ads between the paragraphs of your pages.
  • Anchor: Mobile ads that stick to the edge of the user’s screen and are easily dismissible.
  • Vignette: Mobile full-screen ads that appear between page loads on your site and can be skipped by users at any time.
  • Other: Other ad formats.

Ad layout code (AdSense ad code)
The HTML that is placed on any page of an approved site by the publisher who owns the site, allowing ads to be shown on that page in a specific ad layout format.

Ad impressions
An ad impression is reported whenever an individual ad has begun to download to the user’s device. Different ad formats will display varying numbers of ads, for example, each time a vertical banner appears on your site, you’ll see two ad impressions in your reports. In addition, bear in mind that the number of ads in any ad unit may vary depending on whether the ad unit is displaying standard text ads, expanded text ads or display ads. Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Ad placements dimension
How the ad was placed on your page. For example, was the ad placed in an ad unit that you manually positioned on the page or did AdSense automatically place it on the page for you. This dimension lets you compare the performance of ad units against automatically placed ads.

Values

  • Ad unit
  • Auto/Global
  • Auto/URL group (where ‘URL group’ is the name of your URL group)
  • Other

Ad request
An ad request is counted whenever your website requests ads to be displayed. It is the number of ad units that requested ads (for content ads) or search queries (for search ads). Google reports an ad request each time that a request was sent, even if no ads were returned and backup ads were displayed instead.

Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Ad request RPM
Ad request revenue per thousand impressions (RPM) is calculated by dividing your estimated earnings by the number of ad requests that you made, then multiplying by 1000.

Ad request RPM = (Estimated earnings / Number of ad requests) * 1000

For example, if you earned an estimated £60 from 15,000 ad requests, then your ad request RPM would equal (£60/15,000) * 1000, or £4.00.

Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Ad RPM
Ad revenue per thousand impressions (RPM) is calculated by dividing your estimated earnings by the number of ad impressions you received, then multiplying by 1000.

Ad RPM = (Estimated earnings / Ad impressions) * 1000

For example, if you earned an estimated £180 from 45,000 ad impressions, then your ad RPM would equal (£180/45,000) * 1000, or £4.00.

Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Ad session length
The average number of ad queries per ad session. Ad session length = (Total ad queries / Number of ad sessions)

Ad session RPM
The average earnings per 1,000 sessions. Ad session RPM = (Estimated earnings/Number of ad sessions) * 1,000

Ad sessions
The total number of ad sessions. An ad session is counted whenever a user visits your site and views one or more pages containing ads within a certain period of time.

Ad sessions measurable
The percentage of your traffic for which AdSense was able to measure ad sessions. Note that AdSense might not be able to measure 100% of the ad sessions on your website, for example, if a user has changed their cookie settings.

Ad type
Google offers several different options for the varieties of ad that may appear on your pages and in your reports.

Here’s what you may see:

  • Text (includes text ads that have been rendered in the “display-like” magazine style format)
  • Image
  • Rich media
  • Flash
  • Video
  • Animated image
  • Audio
  • Link units

You can choose what ad type you’d like to display when creating or editing an ad unit and also set default ad type preferences for your account.

Ad unit
An ad unit is one or more Google ads displayed as a result of one piece of the AdSense ad code. You can create, customise and manage ad units on the Ads page in your AdSense account.

Ad unit CTR
The ad request click-through rate (CTR) is the number of ad clicks divided by the number of ad requests.

Ad request CTR = Clicks / Ad requests

For example, if you received seven clicks out of 1000 ad requests, then your ad request CTR would be 0.7%. (7 / 1000 = 0.7%).

Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Adjustments to earnings
Your earnings may include debits or credits for various reasons, all of which are listed on your “Transactions” page. Possible adjustments include:

  • AdSense for search fees: as stated in the Google AdSense Terms and Conditions, your AdSense for search earnings may be offset by fees. This applies to a small number of publishers only.
  • Check fees: costs associated with special delivery of cheques, or stop payment requests.
  • Invalid clicks: publishers are not paid for clicks that are discovered to be invalid. If clicks that are currently showing in your reports are deemed to be invalid, the earnings will be adjusted and advertisers will be reimbursed.
  • Terms and Conditions update (applicable to publishers based in Russia, Israel, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Egypt): debits and credits applied as a result of the Terms and Conditions update, when your contracting entity was changed from Google Inc. to Google Ireland Limited. This change required some internal accounting modifications to your account, but it had no effect on your overall account balance.
  • Other: this covers debits or credits not included in other categories, such as those associated with earnings transfers or costs related to secured express delivery. This category may also include occasional deductions of earnings accrued from advertisers who have defaulted on payment, as noted in the Payment section of Google Terms and Conditions.

Administrator
The highest level of account access that can be assigned to an AdSense user. Administrators:

  • Can view, edit and manage any part of an account.
  • Can see the list of users who have access to an account.
  • Can give account access or change another user’s access level.

API
An application programming interface, or API, is an interface that a computer application or system can use to access a set of third-party functions or programmes. AdSense offers a number of APIs for Google publishers, most notably the AdSense Management API.

Average ad session duration
The average ad session duration in seconds. Average ad session duration = total duration of all the ad sessions (in seconds)/number of ad sessions

Average viewable time
The average length of time (in seconds) that at least 50% of your ads’ pixels were visible on screen. An ad is counted as viewable if at least 50% of its area was displayed on screen for at least one second (the minimum criteria according to Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) standards).

Below the fold
“Below the fold” refers to the portion of the page that is viewable only after a user scrolls down.

Bid type
The bid type is the way that advertisers bid in the auction for your ad space:

  • cost-per-click (CPC)
  • cost-per-thousand impressions (CPM)
  • Active View cost-per-thousand impressions (Active View CPM)
  • cost-per-engagement (CPE)

Blank ads
Blank ads blend in with the background of your web pages. Users can’t see blank ads so the user experience isn’t impacted but, as there’s nothing to click on, you also won’t generate any revenue. Please be aware that blank ads take up the same amount of space as live ads. For example, let’s say you’ve placed the ad code for a 300×250 medium rectangle between two paragraphs on your page. Until live ads start to appear, there’ll be a 300×250 blank space between the two paragraphs.

Blogger
Blogger is a Web-based tool that allows users to quickly and easily create and publish content on a weblog or “blog”.

Browser cache
Your browser cache is a temporary record of your Internet activity (including images, sounds and downloads) that is stored within a file on your computer for a short while. Clearing your cache can make it easier or faster to access some AdSense functions.

Click
For standard content ads, Google counts a click when a user clicks an ad. For link units, Google counts a click when a user clicks an ad on the page of ads, after selecting a link in the link unit.

Click-through rate (CTR)
The click-through rate (CTR) is the percentage of impressions that led to a click. CTR = Clicks / Impressions

Completes
Quartiles are a standard method for measuring the effectiveness of video ads by determining what percentage of a given video was viewed by a user. A count of how many users have seen 100% (Quartile 4) of a video ad.

Contact email
The email address where you would prefer that communications about this AdSense account be sent.

Conversion
When a person who clicked an ad completes a valuable action on the advertiser’s website, such as buying something or requesting more information.

Cookies
For Internet purposes, cookies are small text files downloaded to a user’s computer that can be used to store user information and preferences. Many sites use cookies to customise and improve functionality on repeat visits to a site.

Cost-per-click (CPC)
The cost-per-click (CPC) is the amount that you earn each time a user clicks on your ad. The CPC for any ad is determined by the advertiser; some advertisers may be willing to pay more per click than others, depending on what they’re advertising.

Cost-per-engagement (CPE)
With cost-per-engagement (CPE) bidding, advertisers only pay when users actively engage with ads. For example, advertisers pay for lightbox ads (a type of expandable ad that can expand to a very large size) on a CPE basis, which means that publishers generate earnings from lightbox ads when users choose to engage with the ads, e.g. by hovering over them for two seconds to expand the ads.

Coverage
Coverage is the percentage of ad requests that returned at least one ad. Generally, coverage can help you identify sites where AdSense isn’t able to provide targeted ads.

Formula:
Coverage = (Ad requests that returned ads / total ad requests) * 100

For example, if you have three ad units on a page, then you’ll generate three ad requests. If two of these ad units display ads and one displays no ads, the coverage for this page would be 66.67%. Likewise, if you have a search box, a coverage of 80% means that an average of one query out of five shows no ads with the search results. High coverage, close to 100%, indicates that Google was able to provide ads to most requests. Lower coverage is a sign that Google wasn’t able to provide ads suitable for your page and returned no ads or your specified backup ads instead. Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Crawler
A crawler, also known as a spider or a bot, is the software that Google uses to process and index the content of web pages. The AdSense crawler visits your site to determine its content in order to provide relevant ads.

Custom Search Ads
Custom Search Ads is a Google product that allows publishers who have their own search engine technology to monetise their search results pages. Custom Search Ads is currently only available to a limited number of publishers. If you think your site may be a good fit, Google encourages you to read more and sign up.

If you already use a Google Custom Search product, such as AdSense for search, to receive both search results and ads, then you don’t need to use Custom Search Ads. All Custom Search Engines are automatically monetised without any additional steps needed, and you can track revenue earned in your AdSense for search reports.

Custom Search Engine (CSE)
A Custom Search Engine, often referred to simply as a search engine, is a tailored search experience that allows you provide customised search to your website’s users. With a Custom Search Engine, you can customise the appearance of the search box and search results that you display on your site. You can also refine the search results to make it easier for your users to find the information that they’re looking for on your site. AdSense for search allows you to create a Custom Search Engine and earn by displaying AdSense ads on the search results pages.

Custom search style dimension
The custom search style dimension lets you understand the monetisation performance of your custom search styles.

Values: None: Search ads traffic that didn’t have a custom search style. Style name: Search ads traffic that had a specific custom search style (where “Style name” is the name you provided when you created your custom search style)

Delivery rate
The percentage of times a requested video ad is returned and starts playing. Ad impressions / Ad requests

Destination URL
This is the URL to which ads link. This is the page users see when they click through to an advertiser’s site from an ad. You will need to know this URL if you would like to add it to your URL filter list and block an advertiser’s ads from appearing on your site.

Display ads
Display ads are graphical ads offered in several ad formats. You can see some examples of display ads on Google Example display ads page. For display ads to appear on your pages, you must be opted in to show display ads on your ad space.

Drop-off rate
The percentage of ad responses that did not result in an impression. Essentially, the ad response fell off without completion of the process. Number of impressions / Matched requests *100

Dynamic image ads
Animated image ads are graphical, dynamic images that may appear in your ad units if you have enabled image ads.

Expandable Ads
Expandable ads are rich media ads that can expand beyond the original size of the ad unit, following a user-initiated action. This creates a greater area for the ad, allowing for more interaction from interested users. For instance, expandable ads might stream a movie trailer, show video game clips or display various views of an item for sale.

Favicon
A favicon is a small graphic that an advertiser can use to brand their website, such as their company logo. Text ads typically include a favicon next to the URL, to help make advertisers more recognisable to users.

Host partner website
Host partners allow you to monetise the content that you create on their websites by linking it to your AdSense account. If you’re associated with an AdSense host partner, you’ll see their name listed on the Third party access page of your account, in the “Access and authorisation” section, under “Settings”.

HTML ads
HTML ads are interactive, customised mini-sites that can appear as Google ads on sites using AdSense for content. HTML ads are a type of rich media ad. Here are a few important notes about HTML ads:

  • Sizes: HTML ads can appear in the same ad sizes that support image ads. For HTML ads to show up in one of your ad units, you’ll need to use one of these ad sizes, and also have display ads enabled for that ad unit.
  • Reporting: Google will count a click for each click-through a user makes that leads them to the advertiser’s site. Depending on the advertiser’s implementation, this could be a click on a logo or explicit URL.

IFRAME
An IFRAME is an HTML tag used in web design that allows a web page to be displayed in a frame within another web page.

Impression RPM
The impression revenue per thousand impressions (RPM) is the average earnings per one thousand impressions. Impression RPM = (Estimated earnings / Impressions) * 1000

Impressions
An impression is counted for each ad request where at least one ad has begun to download to the user’s device. It’s the number of ad units (for content ads) or search queries (for search ads) that loaded ads.

A note about impression counting
The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and the Media Rating Council (MRC) in partnership with other industry bodies, periodically review and update industry standards for impression measurement. They recommend guidelines to standardise how impressions are counted across formats and platforms. Over time the standards for counting an ad impression on the web have evolved: from counting an impression when the ad is served, to counting an impression when the ad starts to download on the user’s device (i.e. the ad begins to load on a page).

The definitions are summarised below:

  • Served impression: An impression is counted when an ad is sent (or ‘served’) to a publisher by the ad server. The ad creative may or may not be downloaded to the user’s device, rendered or viewed by the user.
  • Downloaded impression: An impression is counted only after the ad has begun to download to the user’s device.

The AdSense ‘Impressions’ metric uses the downloaded definition for all impressions. Note that the complementary ActiveView viewable metric is used to determine if users actually viewed the impressions.

Impressions per ad session
The average number of ad impressions per ad session. Note that there are usually multiple ad impressions per page load.

Lightbox ads
Lightbox ads are a type of expandable ad that can expand to a very large size (up to 1000×600 pixels). When a user chooses to engage with a Lightbox ad (by hovering the cursor over the ad for two seconds) the ad then expands to the centre of your page. Once the ad is expanded, a translucent layer greys out the background of your page, giving the user a near full-screen ad experience. Lightbox ads are a high-engagement format and are only available on the Google Display Network (GDN).

Lightbox ads are served as third-party ads and are created by Google-certified rich media vendors for the top display advertisers in Google network. Advertisers pay for Lightbox ads on a cost-per-engagement (CPE) basis which means that you generate earnings from Lightbox ads when a user chooses to engage with the ad on your page, i.e. by hovering over it for two seconds to expand the ad.

Link units
A link unit displays a list of topics relevant to the content of your website, and when users click on one of these topics, they’re brought to a page of Google ads related to that topic. Though you won’t receive earnings for clicks on the topics, you’ll be paid for user clicks on any of the ads on the resulting page.

Login
Your AdSense login is also referred to as your account email. This is the email address that you use to log in to your Google AdSense account.

Mid-point
Quartiles are a standard method for measuring the effectiveness of video ads by determining what percentage of a given video was viewed by a user. A count of how many users have seen 50% (Quartile 2) of a video ad.

Non-host partner website
A website hosted on a domain that doesn’t belong to an AdSense host partner. Non-host sites include any domain that you registered yourself.

Page CTR
The page click-through rate (CTR) is the number of ad clicks divided by the number of page views. Page CTR = Clicks / Page views. For example, if you received 2 clicks for 250 page views, your page CTR would be 0.8%. (2/250=0.8%). Note that this metric is only available under the “Custom” metric family tab.

Page RPM
Page revenue per thousand impressions (RPM) is calculated by dividing your estimated earnings by the number of page views that you received, then multiplying by 1000. Page RPM = (Estimated earnings / Number of page views) * 1000. For example, if you earned an estimated $0.15 from 25 page views, then your page RPM would equal ($0.15 / 25) * 1000, or $6.00.

Page view
A page view is what Google counts in your reports every time a user views a page displaying Google ads. Google will count one page view regardless of the number of ads displayed on that page. For example, if you have a page displaying three ad units and it is viewed twice, you will generate two page views.

Primary property
Your primary property is the property to which you don’t need to add any code to enable integrated AdSense-Analytics reporting. Webpages on your primary property only need to have the AdSense ad code to show ads and the Analytics tracking code to enable integrated reporting. Webpages on other properties need AdSense code, Analytics tracking code, and the AdSense Analytics code (ASAC) to enable integrated reporting.

Publisher ID
Your publisher ID is the unique identifier for your account. To protect the security of your account and make it easier for Google to find account-specific details, you may be asked to provide this ID when you communicate with Google.

Quartile 1
Quartiles are a standard method for measuring the effectiveness of video ads by determining what percentage of a given video was viewed by a user. A count of how many users have seen the first 25% (Quartile 1) of a video ad.

Quartile 3
Quartiles are a standard method for measuring the effectiveness of video ads by determining what percentage of a given video was viewed by a user. A count of how many users have seen 75% (Quartile 3) of a video ad.

Query
In your reports, Google counts a query each time a request is made to Google system to display an ad unit. Google will count a query every time an ad unit on your site requests ads, whether or not targeted ads are displayed.

Query CTR
The query click-through rate (CTR) is the number of ad clicks divided by the number of queries reported, then multiplying by 1000. Query CTR = Clicks / Queries. For example, if you received 7 clicks out of 1000 queries, your query CTR would be 0.7%.

Query RPM
Query revenue per thousand impressions (RPM) is calculated by dividing your estimated earnings by the number of queries reported, then multiplying by 1000. Query RPM = (Estimated earnings / Number of queries) * 1000. For example, if you earned an estimated $60 from 15,000 queries, your query RPM would equal ($60 / 15,000) * 1000, or $4.00.

Requested ad types dimension
The kind of ad that your site requested to be displayed, e.g. Text, Text & display, Link unit, Matched content with ads, etc. This dimension shows the ad types you configured your site to request.

Depending on your ad setup, there might be different types of ads served within the requested ad type. For example, let’s say you’ve set up an ad unit to request display ads. Your ad unit might show different types of display ad such as animated image, HTML5, etc. Check out the Served ad types report to see a detailed breakdown of the ads that actually served on your site.

Values

  • Text
  • Text & display
  • Link unit
  • Display
  • Native/Ad
  • Native/Matched Content/With ads
  • Native/Matched Content/No ads
  • Other

Revenue per thousand impressions (RPM)
Revenue per 1000 impressions (RPM) represents the estimated earnings that you’d accrue for every 1000 impressions that you receive. RPM doesn’t represent how much you have actually earned; rather, it’s calculated by dividing your estimated earnings by the number of page views, impressions or queries that you received, then multiplying by 1000.

Formula:
RPM = (Estimated earnings / Number of page views) * 1000

For example:
If you earned an estimated $0.15 from 25 page views, then your page RPM would equal ($0.15 / 25) * 1000, or $6.00. If you earned an estimated $180 from 45,000 ad impressions, your ad RPM would equal ($180 / 45,000) * 1000, or $4.00. RPM is a commonly used number in advertising programmes, and you may find it helpful for comparing revenue across different channels.

Revenue Share
Each AdSense publisher receives a percentage of the auction closing price for ads on their site. This percentage is referred to as the revenue share, and is displayed within your AdSense account.

Rich media ads
A group of interactive ad types that includes HTML, Flash and video ads. You can choose whether you’d like to display rich media ads when creating or editing an ad unit and also set default ad type preferences for your account.

Saved reports
A saved report is a report with specific settings that you’ve customised and saved to use in the future. The date range and settings that you use to generate any report can be set as a saved report for quick access later.

Search box
A search box is the part of a Custom Search Engine that you place on your website using AdSense for search. You can customise a search box and add it to your pages so users can enter terms that they’re looking for on your site or on the web, and perform a search directly from your site.

Search engine
Search engine is shorthand for a Custom Search Engine, a tailored search experience that allows you provide customised search to your website’s users. AdSense for search allows you to create and customise a search engine for your site.

Self-hold
A self-hold is a setting that lets you temporarily prevent payments from being sent to you. When you set a self-hold, your ads will continue to appear and your earnings will continue to accrue as normal. You can remove a self-hold on your payments at any time to reinitiate payments.

Served ad types dimension
The type of ad that was actually served on your site. For example, if you’ve specified an ad unit to request display ads, then you can use this dimension to see exactly what kinds of display ads were shown in your ad unit, e.g. animated image, HTML5, etc.

Depending on your ad setup, there might be different types of ads served within the requested ad type. For example, let’s say you’ve set up an ad unit to request display ads. Your ad unit might show different types of display ad such as animated image, HTML5, etc. You can use the Requested ad types dimension to see which ad type your site requested.

The Served ad types dimension replaces the Ad types dimension, which has now been deprecated.

Values

  • Text
  • Display/Image
  • Display/Animated image
  • Display/Flash
  • Display/HTML5
  • Display/Expandable
  • Display/Other
  • Video (includes all types of video ad)
  • Native/Ad
  • Native/Matched Content/With ads
  • Native/Matched Content/No ads
  • Other

Note that Google uses a “/” naming convention for related kinds of ads.

Standard user
The lowest level of account access that can be assigned to an AdSense user. Standard users:

  • Can view, edit and manage any part of an account.
  • Can’t see the list of users who have access to an account.
  • Can’t give account access or change another user’s access level.

Targetable ad placement
A targetable ad placement is a specific group of ad units on which an advertiser can choose to place their ads using placement targeting. Ad placements can be as broad as an entire website or as specific as a single ad unit. Placements are made visible to advertisers in two ways:

  • Placements automatically created by Google system. Every publisher website in the AdSense network is automatically made available to advertisers as a placement where they can target their ads. When advertisers target this type of placement, their ads may appear anywhere on the website.
  • Placements defined by publishers. You have the ability to define your own ad placements using your custom channels. You choose how to group together specific ad units on your site that you want advertisers to be able to target. Common ways of grouping ad units into custom channels are by topic, ad format or location on a page. When advertisers target publisher-defined ad placements, their ads may only appear in the specific ad units that the publisher has selected.

Targeting types in reporting
The targeting type report shows you how advertisers targeted ads on your site. The data in the report is broken down into the following targeting types:

  • Contextual, targeting based on keyword analysis, word frequency, font size and the overall link structure of the web
  • Placement, targeting based on your site URL
  • Personalised, targeting specific users on your site based on their cookie ID and Google Account if the user opts into these features; however, this targeting type may also include contextual targeting when Google doesn’t have access to user data
  • Run of Network, targeting all sites in the AdSense network, except explicitly excluded sites, according to available inventory
  • None, no targeting used

Text ads
A text ad typically includes a title that’s also a clickable link to a web page, one or two lines of text and a website address shown in green. Text ads are sometimes known as “sponsored links” because the title links to the advertised website. These ads can appear on Google search results pages and across the Google Display Network. Text ads might look slightly different on the Display Network.

TrueView skip rate
The percentage of skips for skippable video ads.

TrueView views
The number of times a skippable video ad is viewed to completion or 30 seconds.

TrueView VTR
The percentage of views for skippable video ads. TrueView Views / TrueView ad impressions

Unbillable
Unbillable ads are ads that aren’t billed in the traditional way (e.g. direct sales) or aren’t monetisable (e.g. Matched content units without ads).

Unbillable impression
AdSense records an unbillable impression for link units when the user doesn’t go on to click any of the ads on the corresponding landing page.

Unseen Impression Filter
The unseen impression filter is an AdWords feature that allows advertisers to prevent their ad from appearing in ad units on the Google Display Network that are not seen or clicked on by users, despite ample opportunity. This includes ad units on AdSense publisher websites.

The intent of the unseen impression filter is to make advertising on the Google Display Network more appealing to brand-focused advertisers who want to have their ads seen by as many users as possible across Google network. By attracting more new advertisers and increasing the spend of existing advertisers, this should improve revenue for publishers. To maximise your AdSense earnings, Google recommends that you place your ads in highly visible areas.

VPAID
The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) defines VPAID (Video Player-Ad Interface Definition) as a standard that allows a video ad and a video player to communicate with each other. VPAID defines a uniform run-time environment so that a compliant player can accept any compliant advertisement from any other party.

What are CPM ads?
CPM stands for “cost per thousand impressions”. Advertisers running CPM ads set their desired price per 1000 ads served, select the specific ad placements on which to show their ads and pay each time their ad appears.

For publishers, this means revenue in your account each time a CPM ad is served to your page. CPM ads compete against pay-per-click (or CPC, cost-per-click) ads in Google ad auction, so only the highest performing ads will be served to your pages. Advertisers will need to bid a higher CPM than the existing CPC ads in order to show.

CPM ads can be either text or image ads and are always placement-targeted. CPM text ads will expand to take up the entire ad unit. These expanded text ads can be viewed on Google Ad Formats page.

What is a Google Account?
A Google Account functions as a master Google login, made up of a single email address and password.

Although a Google Account is similar to an AdSense login, your Google Account lets you easily jump to any of your Google services that also share this login (such as Google Groups, Google Mail and Google Product Search). This way, once you are signed in, you stay in – no more logging in and out between multiple services.